Olive Oil and its Benefits

Olive Oil and its Benefits

For over 4,000 years olive oil has been “valued through the ages for food, fuel, salve, and sacrament. Today, the olive’s liquid gold remains unsurpassed among oils, . For thousands of years, the simple process of obtaining olive oil has remained the same. First, the harvesters beat the trees’ branches with rods to make the olives fall to the ground, where they are gathered. Then, the whole olives, including the pits, are crushed in a mill. Next, the solids are removed. Finally, the oil is separated from the water in…

Read More

Mexican Pyramids

Mexican pyramids are large pile of earth with a temple at the very top and an external staircase that provides access to the summit.One of the most outstanding pyramid sites in Mexico is Teotihuacán. Located about 33 miles [50 km] northeast of Mexico City, Teotihuacán is still a mystery to anthropologists and archaeologists. This ancient metropolis was abandoned by its builders more than 500 years before the Aztec culture emerged. The name Teotihuacán, from the Nahuatl language, means “The City of the Gods” or “Where Men Become Gods.” It is thought that the Aztecs…

Read More

History of the Tower of London

The Tower of London. For nearly a thousand years, this great fortress, palace, and prison played a central role in England’s turbulent history. Through its gates passed kings, queens, courtiers, churchmen, politicians, and judges—some to emerge in triumph, others never to be seen alive again. inside its walls shaped the course of English history. The Royal Fortress After Duke William of Normandy invaded England in 1066, he constructed a series of castles to intimidate the hostile Anglo-Saxons. The most formidable building came to be in the city of London. The wooden fort initially erected inside the southeast corner of theold Roman walls was soon replaced…

Read More

Coco-De-Mer-The World’s Largest Seed

Coco-De-Mer, discovered in the middle of the 18th century. is a type of palm tree found only in the Seychelles, a small group of islands in the Indian Ocean. The largest concentration of the Coco-De-Mer is found in the Vallée de Mai, on the island of Praslin. These palms can reach up to 100 feet [30 m] in height and are estimated to live for hundreds of years. One fascinating fact about the Coco-De-Mer is that it is dioecious; there are male trees and female trees. For the female to produce fruit, it must be pollinated by a male Coco-De-Mer. So…

Read More

Origin of the Chihuahua

The Chihuahua is characterized by a well-rounded head, wide-set luminous eyes, a saucy expression, and erect ears, which flare to the sides when in repose. They have short soft hair or long silky hair, and some may be red, blond, blue, or chocolate-colored as well as solid, marked, or splashed. A unique feature of most Chihuahua puppies is the soft spot on the crown, similar to that of a newborn baby.While there are different theories regarding the origin of the Chihuahua as a breed, it appears to have descended from a small dog…

Read More

How Korean Language (Hankul)was Invented

BEFORE Hankul was created, the Korean language did not have its own script. For more than a thousand years, educated Koreans wrote their language using Chinese characters. Over the years, however, various attempts were made to devise a better writing system. But since all of them were based on Chinese characters, only the well-educated could use them. An Alphabet Ordered by a King In the 15th century C.E., King Sejong of the Korean Yi dynasty began to contemplate the frustrations of his subjects who could neither read nor write. Most had no…

Read More

The Origin of Medicine

In 805 C.E., CALIPH HARUN AR-RASHID established a hospital in his capital, Baghdad. From the 9th century through the 13th, other rulers built and maintained hospitals throughout the Islamic empire, from Spain to India. These hospitals welcomed the rich and the poor of all religions. Professional physicians not only treated the sick there but also did research and trained new practitioners. Separate wards were set aside for different specialties—internal medicine, ophthalmology, orthopedics, surgery, contagious disease, and mental infirmity. Doctors, accompanied by their students, examined the sick each morning and prescribed diets and…

Read More

CAHOKIA- The origin of Native Americans

CAHOKIA- The origin of Native Americans WHEN you think of historic cities, which ones come to mind? Rome, London, Paris? What about Cahokia? ‘Cahokia?’ you might ask. Yes, Cahokia—located in Illinois, eight miles [13 km] east of St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. Large, sophisticated, and well planned, it ranked as an outstanding American Indian city for 500 years. At the height of its civilization, about 1150 C.E., Cahokia was bigger than either London or Rome of that time. Encompassing more than five square miles [13 km2], according to one source, Cahokia “was unquestionably the largest prehistoric…

Read More

INVENTION OF PENCIL 

In the 16th century, lumps of a strange black substance were found beneath the hillside of Borrowdale, a valley in the Lake District of northern England. Although the mineral looked like coal, it did not burn; and it left a shiny, black, easily erased mark on a writing surface. Initially, the substance had a variety of names—black lead, wad, and plumbago, meaning “that which acts like lead.” Because it had a greasy texture, people wrapped chunks of it with sheepskin or short sticks of it with string. No one knows who…

Read More

THE ORIGIN OF FIREWORKS

Fireworks have become synonymous with celebration. Eruptions of light commemorate Independence Day in the United States, celebrate Bastille Day in France, and illuminate the skies over nearly every major city in the world each New Year’s Eve. Most historians agree that the Chinese invented fireworks about the tenth century of our Common Era, when Oriental chemists discovered that combining saltpeter (potassium nitrate) with sulfur and charcoal produces an explosive compound. Western explorers, such as Marco Polo, or possibly Arab traders were responsible for bringing this volatile substance to Europe, and…

Read More

Crude Oil Discovery”The Black Gold”

In 1859, Edwin L. Drake, a retired railroad conductor, using an old steam engine, drilled a well 70 feet [22 meters] deep to the first crude oil discovered near Titusville, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. That marked the beginning of the oil era. As oil was discovered in many parts of the world, it caused great economic and political repercussions. It proved to be the high-quality source of artificial light that the world eagerly awaited. Soon, frantic buying of land and drilling of wells was a major activity in the so-called oil regions of…

Read More

Salt, an Essential Commodity

Salt, an Essential Commodity Throughout history, salt (sodium chloride) has been such a precious commodity that wars were even fought over it. One of the contributing causes of the French Revolution was the high tax on salt imposed by Louis XVI. Salt was also used as a valuable medium of exchange. Moorish merchants traded salt for gold, gram for gram, and some central African tribes used slabs of rock salt as money. The English word “salary” comes from the Latin salarium (from sal, salt), referring to the early Roman soldier’s wages,…

Read More